After IMC Leeds 2017

This year’s International Medieval Congress in Leeds came to an end. The Presbyters Project hosted two sessions that drew a considerable audience. In the first session, David Hunter presented a paper on the clerical profits in the writings of Ambrosiaster which was followed by David Natal’s paper on the Church and private property in Ambrose of Milan. This discussion on the fourth-century Italy was counterpointed by a paper by Marta Szada on the economic status of the local clergy in the seventh-century Spain.

 

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David Natal presenting his paper. In the audience (from left) David Hunter, Robert Wiśniewski and Bertrand Lançon.

 

In the second session, Isabelle Mossong gave a survey of epigraphical evidence from Italy that could serve to define more precisely the economic role of presbyters, Claire Sotinel presented the material provided by the papal correspondence, and eventually, the P.I. of the Presbyters Project, Robert Wiśniewski delivered a paper on the payments received by clerics for ritual expertise. To our delight, in both sessions, the papers were followed by vivid discussions, especially that the papers probably offered more questions than answers. Hopefully, soon our database will help scholars in all over the world to answer those (and many others) questions about the presbyters in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages.

 

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Sessions of the Presbyters Project at IMC Leeds 2017

This year again the project “Presbyters in the Late Antique West” will be present at the International Medieval Congress in Leeds. We are organizing two sessions on 5 July about income and property of clerics in Late Antiquity.

The schedule of the sessions:

Income and Property of Clerics  in Late Antiquity I, 5 July 2017, 09.00-10.30, Social Sciences Building, Room 10.05

  1. Ambrosiaster and the Problem of Clerical Profit
    • David Hunter, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures, University of Kentucky
  2. Church and Private Property in Ambrose of Milan (d. 397)
    • David Natal Villazala, Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología, Universidad de Salamanca
  3. The Workman Is Worthy of His Meat?: Economic Status of the Local Clergy in 7th-Century Spain
    • Marta Szada, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski

Income and Property of Clerics in Late Antiquity II, 5 July 2017, 11.15–12.45, Social Sciences Building, Room 10.05

  1. Income and Property of Late Antique Clergy: Epigraphical Realities
    • Isabelle Mossong, Kommission für Alte Geschichte und Epigraphik, Deutsches Archäologisches InsKtut, München
  2. Financial Issues Concerning Presbyters in Papal Correspondence
    • Claire Sotinel, Centre de recherche en histoire européenne comparée (CRHEC), Université Paris-Est Créteil Val de Marne
  3. Not a Grand Scandal, but Little Embarrassment: Paying Clerics for Ritual Expertise in Late Antiquity
    • Robert Wiśniewski, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski

Here the schedule in PDF: Income_Plaw

Presbyters on the IMC Leeds 2017

On the forthcoming International Medieval Congress in Leeds our project organises two sessions about the income and property of clerics in Late Antiquity.

Late antique clerics had diverse sources of income. Some of them were rich when they got ordained, but others had to earn their life. These sessions will seek to answer the following questions: How much did the clerics rely on church property and revenues? What were other sources of their income, either those linked with their religious expertise or unconnected with ecclesiastical activity? How were the frontiers fixed between not only private property and revenues of clerics and those of the church, but also between the resources of diverse groups of clergy?

The schedule is as follows:

Wednesday, 5 July, 9.00-10.30

Income and Property of Clerics in Late Antiquity, I (session 1031)

chair: Ralph W. Mathisen, Department of History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

  1. David Hunter, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky,  Ambrosiaster and the Problem of Clerical Profit
  2. David Natal Villazala, Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología, Universidad de Salamanca, Church and Private Property in Ambrose of Milan (d. 397)
  3. Marta Szada, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski, The Workman Is Worthy of His Meat?: Economic Status of the Local Clergy in 7th-Century Spain

Wednesday, 5 July, 11.15-12.45

chair: Ralph Mathisen, Department of History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

  1. Isabelle Mossong, Kommission für Alte Geschichte und Epigraphik, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, München, Income and Property of Late Antique Clergy: Epigraphical Realities
  2. Claire Sotinel, Centre de recherche en histoire européenne comparée (CRHEC), Université Paris-Est Créteil Val de Marne, Financial Issues Concerning Presbyters in Papal Correspondence
  3. Robert Wiśniewski, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski, Not a Grand Scandal, but Little Embarrassment: Paying Clerics for Ritual Expertise in Late Antiquity

See also at the IMC website: session 1, session 2

CfP: Clerical income and property in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages (IMC Leeds 2017)

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, organises a strand on the income and property of clergy. In most literary and normative sources, we usually see clerics entirely dependent on diverse types of subsidies related to their ecclesiastical office.

But some casual remarks and documentary evidence show that the reality was more complicated. The actual sources of income of clerics were diverse. This session will seek to answer the following questions:

  • How much did the clerics rely on church property and revenues?
  • What were other sources of their income, either those linked with the religious expertise or unconnected with ecclesiastical activity?
  • How the frontiers were fixed between the private property and revenues of clerics and those of the church, but also between the resources of diverse groups of clerics?

Those interested in presenting papers on such topics, particularly if focused on the period before c. 900, are requested to send the title and a short abstract (c. 100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) by 20 September. Please, note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.