CfP: Priest and his church (IMC Leeds 2019)

CfP: Priest and his church
Material aspects of the ministry of late antique and early medieval clerics

IMC Leeds 2019

At the forthcoming International Medieval Congress in Leeds (1-4 July 2019) the Presbyters in the Late Antique West project is organising a session on material aspects of the ministry of late antique and early medieval clerics.

Clerics were obviously responsible for the cult or, more generally, spiritual care.  But that was only part of late of their usual activity. It was so not only because most of them had to pursue a non-ecclesiastical profession in order to provide for their families. It was also because running the church required taking care of all sort of mundane issues:

 

  • church buildings (dilapidation, leaking roof, a place to live for church staff)
  • necessary consumables: oil for lamps, chrism, bread, wine, books, church linens
  • church property
  • financial resources and financial relations with the bishop.

 

We will take a closer look at these spheres of clerical activity seeking to understand how the local church functioned from the material, organizational and financial point of view. Those interested in presenting a paper at these sessions are requested to send the title and short abstract (up to 200 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) before 15 September.

These sessions will be sponsored by the Presbyters in the Late Antique West project,

based at the University of Warsaw (https://projectpresbyters.wordpress.com). Please note that the project, sadly, the project cannot cover conference fee and travel expenses.

 

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CfP: From Elders to the Priests (XVIII. Oxford Patristic Conference)

At the forthcoming XVIII. International Conference on Patristic Studies (19-24 August 2019) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, organizes a workshop on the late antique clergy, with particular attention given to the middle grade of the ordination: the presbyterate.

This workshop will seek to answer the following questions:

  • What meaning is hidden behind the different words used to describe the priests in the first millennium: presbyter, sacerdos, pontifex and how this meaning evolved?
  • How did it happen that the Levitical paradigm was adopted to describe the ministers of the Church?
  • How closely are the role and perceiving of the presbyters connected to the celebration of the Eucharist and the development of its understanding as the sacrifice?
  • What is special about the presbyters, what makes them different from other grades of ecclesiastical hierarchy?

 

Those interested in presenting papers on such and similar topics are requested to send the title and a short abstract (ca 100-200 words) to Stanisław Adamiak (s.adamiak2@uw.edu.pl) by 15 August 2018. Please note that unfortunately, the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

The papers will be presented at the afternoon workshop sessions, which gives a possibility of more time for the paper itself (20-30 minutes) and the discussion than in the morning sessions of short communications. You can find other useful information on the website: https://www.oxfordpatristics.com/information.

CfP: Clerics in Church and society up to AD 700

CfP: Clerics in Church and society up to AD 700

The Presbyters in the Late Antique West is a 5-years project, run at the University of Warsaw and investigating the role of the middle clergy in the Church and society. Our team has been collecting the evidence concerning clerics withina searchable database, still under construction, but accessible on-line: http://presbytersproject.ihuw.pl/(username: editor, password: editor123!).

The project is slowly coming to its end, and we are organising the closing conference “Clerics in Church and society up to AD 700”. The conference will take place in Warsaw, on 26-27 April 2019. The word ‘clerics’ include bishops, but our main interest lies in the presbyters, deacons, and subdeacons etc.  We are aiming to achieve a broad picture of their ecclesiastical, economic, and social activity. Among confirmed speakers are: Geoffrey Dunn, Uta Heil, David Hunter, Dominic Moreau, David Natal, and Eric Rebillard.

Those interested in presenting papers are requested to send a title and short abstract (c. 100 words) to Stanisław Adamiak (s.adamiak2@uw.edu.pl) by 30 September 2018.

There is no registration fee, but please, note we won’t be able to cover travel and accommodation expenses.

Robert Wiśniewski and Stanisław Adamiak

IMC Leeds 2018 CfP: Clerics and Their Households

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (2-5 July 2018) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, together with Lisa Bailey of the University of Auckland, organizes a strand on the everyday life of clergy. We would like to have a glimpse of what was happening inside the houses of the clerics, especially in the period when they were still running large family households.

This session will seek to answer the following questions:

  • What was the legal status of the wives and children of clerics, both from the ecclesiastical and civil point of view?
  • What was the position of the servants and slaves in the households of clerics?
  • How did the relations with their familiars and neighbours influence the opinions and preaching of the clerics?
  • What do archaeology and epigraphy tell us about the living conditions of the clergy in the first millennium?

Those interested in presenting papers on such and similar topics are requested to send the title and a short abstract (ca 100 words) to Stanisław Adamiak (s.adamiak2@uw.edu.pl) and Lisa Bailey (lk.bailey@auckland.ac.nz) by 20 September 2017. Please note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

CfP: Clerical income and property in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages (IMC Leeds 2017)

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, organises a strand on the income and property of clergy. In most literary and normative sources, we usually see clerics entirely dependent on diverse types of subsidies related to their ecclesiastical office.

But some casual remarks and documentary evidence show that the reality was more complicated. The actual sources of income of clerics were diverse. This session will seek to answer the following questions:

  • How much did the clerics rely on church property and revenues?
  • What were other sources of their income, either those linked with the religious expertise or unconnected with ecclesiastical activity?
  • How the frontiers were fixed between the private property and revenues of clerics and those of the church, but also between the resources of diverse groups of clerics?

Those interested in presenting papers on such topics, particularly if focused on the period before c. 900, are requested to send the title and a short abstract (c. 100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) by 20 September. Please, note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

Call for Papers – IMC Leeds 2016

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (4-7 July 2016) the project team is organising a session focused on the social relations of the clergy in Late Antiquity and early Middle Ages. The clerics did not act in a social void, they had friends, partners, allies, patrons, and enemies. We are interested in their relations with family, magistrates, lay people, monks and other members of the clergy, in all regions of the Christian world.

We welcome both papers dealing with wider phenomena, such as relations of presbyters with monks or links between clergy and urban elites, and on specific case studies. We are open for contributions based on very different types of evidence, from narrative, liturgical and legislative texts, to epigraphic and iconographic sources. Those interested in presenting paper at this session are requested to send title and short abstract (100 words) to Robert Wiś›niewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) before 20 September. Please note that the project, sadly, cannot cover conference fee and travel expenses.