IMC Leeds 2018 CfP: Clerics and Their Households

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (2-5 July 2018) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, together with Lisa Bailey of the University of Auckland, organizes a strand on the everyday life of clergy. We would like to have a glimpse of what was happening inside the houses of the clerics, especially in the period when they were still running large family households.

This session will seek to answer the following questions:

  • What was the legal status of the wives and children of clerics, both from the ecclesiastical and civil point of view?
  • What was the position of the servants and slaves in the households of clerics?
  • How did the relations with their familiars and neighbours influence the opinions and preaching of the clerics?
  • What do archaeology and epigraphy tell us about the living conditions of the clergy in the first millennium?

Those interested in presenting papers on such and similar topics are requested to send the title and a short abstract (ca 100 words) to Stanisław Adamiak (s.adamiak2@uw.edu.pl) and Lisa Bailey (lk.bailey@auckland.ac.nz) by 20 September 2017. Please note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

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CfP: Clerical income and property in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages (IMC Leeds 2017)

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, organises a strand on the income and property of clergy. In most literary and normative sources, we usually see clerics entirely dependent on diverse types of subsidies related to their ecclesiastical office.

But some casual remarks and documentary evidence show that the reality was more complicated. The actual sources of income of clerics were diverse. This session will seek to answer the following questions:

  • How much did the clerics rely on church property and revenues?
  • What were other sources of their income, either those linked with the religious expertise or unconnected with ecclesiastical activity?
  • How the frontiers were fixed between the private property and revenues of clerics and those of the church, but also between the resources of diverse groups of clerics?

Those interested in presenting papers on such topics, particularly if focused on the period before c. 900, are requested to send the title and a short abstract (c. 100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) by 20 September. Please, note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers’ expenses.

Call for Papers – IMC Leeds 2016

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (4-7 July 2016) the project team is organising a session focused on the social relations of the clergy in Late Antiquity and early Middle Ages. The clerics did not act in a social void, they had friends, partners, allies, patrons, and enemies. We are interested in their relations with family, magistrates, lay people, monks and other members of the clergy, in all regions of the Christian world.

We welcome both papers dealing with wider phenomena, such as relations of presbyters with monks or links between clergy and urban elites, and on specific case studies. We are open for contributions based on very different types of evidence, from narrative, liturgical and legislative texts, to epigraphic and iconographic sources. Those interested in presenting paper at this session are requested to send title and short abstract (100 words) to Robert Wiś›niewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) before 20 September. Please note that the project, sadly, cannot cover conference fee and travel expenses.